In the Past

Tahoe/Truckee’s history

Four Decades of Selfless Service

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With over 500 lives saved on the mountain, Tahoe Nordic Search and Rescue has come a long way from a group of concerned parents and friends responding to a tragic loss. Here is the story of the group’s 54-year history.

When Worldwide Church of God invaded North Lake Tahoe!

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The week-long Church of God gathering would bring 10,000 church members to Squaw Valley every fall, bolstering the fall economy, but the church turned out to be controversial.

50 Years as a Tahoe Ski Bum

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Ever wonder what has changed over the last 50 years in Tahoe? Dick Tash has seen it all … or at least a lot of it.

The Sorceress of the North Shore

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A biplane in the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Chantilly, Virginia, brings memories of one incident that in 1991 astounded many people in the North Lake Tahoe community.

By Rail, By River, By Lake

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Two trains through the mountains and by the river and a steamer on the lake, all with coordinated guided stops: What brought this about in the early 1900s at a time when travel in the mountainous and sometimes dangerous terrain of the Sierra Nevada was far from easy? It was the business dream of a man named Bliss, and he built his life around making it a reality.

The Tahoe Colony That Never Was

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Frank Lloyd Wright had a vision in the 1920s for a Tahoe Summer Colony in Emerald Bay that never came to fruition.

Blow the Lid Off!

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Why are there no records of a peak being flattened in one of the most renowned ski jumping spots in the U.S?

Anatomy of a Phone Number

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Reminiscing on the evolution of Truckee’s phone numbers, and what the nostalgia means to one local resident.

Jerry Garcia at Squaw Valley

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In late August of 1991, thousands of Deadheads peacefully descended upon Squaw Valley to see the Jerry Garcia Band perform under sunny skies, in...

The Black Pioneer of Plumas County

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Could it be that a mountain man who was a blacksmith, horse thief, cavalry scout, and Crow Indian chief — with peaks, passes, waterways, and towns all named in his honor — was ignored because he was a black man?