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The Stars | Jan. 10 - Feb. 13, 2019

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Astrology

The new year ushers in the next eclipse season, with a partial solar eclipse on Jan. 5 in Capricorn, followed by a total lunar eclipse in Leo on Jan. 20. These eclipses herald the start of the new eclipse cycle, as the nodes of the Moon shift from the Leo-Aquarius axis to that of Cancer-Capricorn. The Leo-Aquarian dynamic joins the individual and the collective, teaching us how to use our unique self-expression for the benefit of humanity. Now, as we move into the lessons of Cancer and Capricorn, the focus shifts to the relationship between our home life and our social standing. Cancer rules over intimate matters including the home, family, and domestic affairs. Capricorn is industrious by nature, ruling our self-discipline, work ethic, and professional success. Metaphorically, eclipses expose what lies repressed or dormant in the psyche. As the eclipses align to this new axis, we will be confronted with challenges that test how we balance our personal and public lives. These lessons will demonstrate the connection between our need for nurturing and our ambition to succeed. As you reach for new heights, remember: Deep roots create healthy fruits.

Astronomy

As we enter the new year, Venus and Jupiter are the planets to watch. Venus, already apparent in the pre-dawn sky, reaches her farthest position from the Sun on Jan. 6. Following this event, Earth’s sister planet will descend back toward the eastern horizon as Jupiter ascends, with the latter planet becoming more easily visible as it separates from the Sun. On Jan. 22, the two planets will meet in the morning sky, rising together on the eastern horizon a few hours before sunrise, and climbing higher until the increasing sunlight overpowers their shine. Two days before this magnificent pairing, a total lunar eclipse will grace our skies on the evening of Jan. 20. Lunar eclipses always occur at the full moon phase, and full moons always rise in the east as the sun sets in the west. To view this eclipse, find a good angle to watch the eastern horizon. The moon will fall into the Earth’s shadow as it rises above the eastern horizon, reaching totality at approximately 9 p.m., after which it will begin to brighten once more. The eclipse ends shortly before midnight, as the Moon reaches its apex in the southern sky.

~ Dawn Andreoni is yoga teacher and astrologer living on the North Shore of Lake Tahoe. You can find more about her offerings at celestialdawnastrology.com or follow her at facebook.com/astronotions

 
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February 14, 2019